Ashleigh Thomas

Ashleigh joined Henderson Loggie in 2007 and trained and qualified as a Chartered Accountant in 2010.  After a short time away gaining experience in business support and accounting she returned in 2016 and now manages the accounting and business solutions department providing accounting and independent examination services to clients including sole traders, partnerships, companies and charities across various sectors.

Ashleigh oversees the provision of various accounting services to our clients including the preparation of statutory accounts, preparation and review of management accounts, VAT returns, bookkeeping, budgeting, forecasting and payroll.  She is also responsible for overseeing various company secretarial responsibilities.

Ashleigh is a certified Xero user and also has experience with other accounting packages including Sage, KashFlow, FreeAgent and Quickbooks.

Ashleigh is a key member of the firm’s Agriculture & Rural and Games & Digital Sector Teams. Ashleigh enjoys working across a diverse range of sectors and her clients value the cross sector experience she brings.

Should I set up my business as a Sole Trader or a Limited Company? (Pros & Cons)



Are you thinking about starting your business but are unsure about whether to set up as a Sole Trader or a Limited Company?

In this short video Debbie Gallacher, Accounts Manager here at Henderson Loggie, shares with you some of the advantages and disadvantages of both of these options.

Covered in this video:

✅ Sole Trader Advantages & Disadvantages
✅ Limited Company Advantages & Disadvantages

If you have any queries, or you are unsure what to do, please feel free to contact Debbie directly by email at debbie.gallacher@hlca.co.uk


I often meet with startup businesses who are really excited about their new venture and one question I often get asked is, “Should I set my business up as a sole trader or a limited company?” I’m not going to go through all the pros and cons and I’m not here to say which is the best option as this will depend upon your personal circumstances and how you want to run your business.

Sole Trader Advantages & Disadvantages

One of the advantages of being a sole trader is the fact that it’s easy to set up and there’s little administration. You will need to maintain your accounting records for your income and your business expenditure and any profits will be chargeable to tax under the personal tax regime. Another advantage of being a sole trader is the fact that your trading results will remain private for the year. However, a disadvantage of being a sole trader is the fact that if your business gets into debt, you will be personally liable for these debts.

Limited Company Advantages & Disadvantages

A limited company is a separate legal entity in its own right and your liability will be restricted to the amount you invest in the company’s share capital. However, there’s a lot more administration with running a limited company. Every year you will need to submit to Companies House statutory accounts in a confirmation statement. You will also need to prepare and submit to HRMC the company’s corporation tax return. It is worth noting though if you’re a small company you will only need to submit to Companies House the balance sheet and related notes. You don’t need to submit the profit and loss account which shows the trading for the year.

Any questions about setting up as a Sole Trader or a Limited Company?

So I’ve gone over a couple of the options of being a sole trader and a limited company. The option that’s best for you will depend on your personal circumstances. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us via the form below.

The information in this video is of a general nature and seeks to highlight some of the issues which could be affecting you and/or your business, including changes to financial regulation and legislation. Viewers should not rely on this information without seeking professional advice on its application in their circumstances.

Why should I move to cloud accounting software? (Pros & Cons)



Are you thinking about switching to cloud accounting software but are unsure if this is the best option for you?

In this short video Fiona Morgan, Partner & Head of Accounting at MHA Henderson Loggie, shares with you some of the benefits and drawbacks of using cloud accounting software.

Covered in this video:

✅ Benefits of cloud accounting software
✅ Cloud accounting software drawbacks

If you have any queries, or you are unsure what to do, please feel free to contact Fiona directly by email at fiona.morgan@hlca.co.uk


A question I’m regularly asked is, “Why should I move to cloud accounting software?” The question’s a good one, because what is it exactly that you’re moving from? Is it a manual cashbook? Is it an Excel spreadsheet, or are you moving away from a traditional desktop-based package? In this short video, I’m going to talk over some of the key pros and cons in respect of cloud accounting software.


Benefits of Cloud Accounting Software

One of the key benefits is the ability to access your data from anywhere in the world. From a laptop, a desktop, or a mobile device with an internet connection. Providing you with real-time information in respect of the financial position and performance of your business. For some, they may also be able to get paid faster, because you’ve got the ability to track invoices, check when they’ve been opened or not, and chase up the unpaid ones quicker. And of course, the cloud packages will be compliant for making tax digital purposes. Keeping your data up to date enables you to work with your accountant to seek out any tax planning opportunities that you would be able to then take advantage of.


Cloud Accounting Software Drawbacks

However, the main drawback is that it’s only as good as the data that you put in. So it’s imperative that you keep your data up to date so that you are in a good place to make some financial decisions with it. The other drawback that some people mention is cost, and this isn’t just the financial outlay for the package itself, which can range from anywhere between £10 to £20 a month, but it’s also the cost of the investment in training you and your teams on how to use the package effectively. It is worth spending some time making sure that you get the right package for you.


Any questions about cloud accounting software?

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us via the form below.

The information in this video is of a general nature and seeks to highlight some of the issues which could be affecting you and/or your business, including changes to financial regulation and legislation. Viewers should not rely on this information without seeking professional advice on its application in their circumstances.